Home » My End to End Land's End to John O'Groats long walk blog » Leg 5: Days 18 to 21: Taunton to Wells Somerset, May 23-26 2017, 45.27 miles (73 km). Total walked so far: 273 miles (440 km)

Leg 5: Days 18 to 21: Taunton to Wells Somerset, May 23-26 2017, 45.27 miles (73 km). Total walked so far: 273 miles (440 km)

“Always say “yes” to the present moment. What could be more futile, more insane, than to create inner resistance to what already is? What could be more insane than to oppose life itself, which is now and always now? Surrender to what is. Say “yes” to life – and see how life suddenly starts working for you rather than against you”

– Eckhart Tolle

Leg 5: Days 18 to 21: Taunton to Wells, Somerset, May 23-26 2017, 45.27 miles (73 km). Total walked so far: 273 miles (440 km)

 

River Tone & Bridgewater & Taunton canal

Approaching the big flat water lands of north Somerset 

 

Young bulls and cows are so curious about us. They don’t seem to be that used to people and tend to follow us around.  I find this a bit un-nerving but the Dean and Emma  loved their popularity!

“Better Days Bridge”.

Made friends with Alan, trainspotter extraordinaire and ended up waiting with him, and learning A LOT about trains, for 3 hours, in order to see the FLYING SCOTSMAN zoom by, a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity!  Called our landlady and she and her husband rushed over as well to see it.  They gave us a short lift in their pickup truck home.  D&E loved riding in back of pickup more than seeing (and waiting for)  this world-famous train in speedy action….

 

Alan doing his thing!

And here she blows…finally!

THE NATION’S FAVOURITE LOCOMOTIVE”

The one and only……FLYING SCOTSMAN!

The man waving on left told me that he clearly remembers the last time he saw this train, from the top of a bus in Glasgow, he was 8 years old, that was 50 years ago…. 

Take a look at this:

http://www.flyingscotsman.org.uk/

Jane, our lovely landlady in Meare Green. She has 500 dairy cows and produces 5 million gallons of milk each year milking them 3x a day (!!) but makes more money with her 2 Burman cats, breeding kittens!  She blames the price of milk and the supermarkets.  The whole thing is a sham and we should just stop consuming so much dairy.  Better for our health, our planet and even for Jane and her very handsome husband!

The real cash cow on the dairy!

A few of Jane’s cows.

Spent a long time with these guys, trying to give them some love and affection.  They were so clearly traumatised, confused and missing their mommies we could just feel it and it hurt.  By now they are probably a chunk of antibiotic-ridden veal cutlet being crushed between two unassuming human molars…

Here we are at The Isle of Athelney, best known for once being the fortress hiding place of King Alfred the Great, from where he went on to defeat the Danes at the Battle of Edington in May 878.

And now… some pretty black headed swaledales posing for the camera..

Burrow Mump is also known as St Michael’s Borough or Tutteyate. Both words ‘burrow’ and ‘mump’ mean hill.

A cute line-up on Burrow Mump. keeping cool in the shade.

Cheery jolly photographer Chris, I bet he once was a looker….before he decided to cover his face with an octopus that is…

Alba “of Burrow Mump” on a photo shoot. She aspires for a career as a model in Florida and hopes Chris’s snaps will make a good portfolio to take with her.  She was sweet and I wish her all the best.

 

 

Welcome  committee in Middlezoy. Chatty lady walking her mower, as one does! She told me a long funny story about a simple man some time ago, who was complaining about the ‘three naked people’ who are on the side of the road.  I quite like this wicker family as I really liked this village.

Retired geography teacher John joined us at the George pub for lunch in MIDDLEZOY. Oh! I fell in love with this village!! He said we inspired him to do this long walk some day but he inspired us so much with his talk of ley lines and divining rods.  He even explained how we could make our own divining rods with two biros and a wire hanger. I asked him what he is looking for with his rods, he said: “Anything..water…metal…love…”.  Veronique told me yesterday that I was walking along St Michael and St Mary’s ley lines and John seems to be in tune with this. 

St Michael and St Mary lines

 

To add to my love of Middlezoy, where I hope to retire, there are cows around town…

King’s Segemoor Drain is miles and miles long and straight with no marked footpath, just swans and bulls…

Mental note: wear long trousers when walking in nettles for miles.. Emma was more clever.

Ever so curious to see us, they always seem to rush over and stare. In Switzerland calfs don’t behave like this. Cows stare, but never rush over like a stampede. It is as if they are not used to seeing humans. Probably due to the mechanisation of animal agriculture…

Entering Glastonbury

Glastonbury vibe.

Callum sells his friend’s truly delicious vegan ice-cream.

Ended up chatting with Jim for a long time while he was waiting for his gorgeous wife of 50 years, Valerie (72 yrs old!) while she was getting silk strands put in her hair. Each time I talk to people I get a gold mine of life: He is a silk screener who became a potter and then, the engineer who designed the ‘machine that makes roads’ and from there a builder of glass houses, conservatories.

Later on, walking along the long Long drove in the heat, we ran into them again, as they drove past us. I almost asked for a ride but…no, we are walking !

Long Drove Rhyne: another long straight road after Glastonbury.

Glastonbury Tor

Local guy along the Long Drove.

Hot hot hot day

Wellesley Farm premier holiday cottages and it’s alpacas. No, we didn’t stay here. Very posh!

Happy feet

the grandest and my favourite: poppies

A welcome rest in Dinder. It was not until we got to the next village, Croscombe that we found out that we were at the home of Christopher Sommerville. This name might not ring a bell if you are not a walker, but if you are, he’s a God!

About the Author

Voyan, our landlady at the George Inn in Croscombe. A lovely delicious friendly pub, where our funky room under the eves was a haven of rest! At breakfast, her husband Peter sat with us and we had a long chat about his new business venture.

Croscombe church and it’s rare box pews.

Solar farm just north of Croscombe. Now here is the future!

Again… followed by young bulls. These ended up funnelling up at exit of field, I had to push them away so D&E could get out of field. Not pleased!

We were glad we took Jim and Valerie’s advice and stopped in Wells. Beautiful medieval town.

To walk or not to walk? Come visit the Bishop’s Manor!

Wells cathedral

Vicar’s close, Wells: the oldest residential street in Europe! 1340

 

Best leg ever, because my kids granted me 4 days in their busy summer.

 

6 Responses so far.

  1. Amy Lebenzon says:
    So beautiful! You, the kids and the scenery! Thanks for sharing. Hope to see you soon.
  2. Kim says:
    What a gorgeous trip! Thanks for sharing and inspiring us. And I love all the commentary 🙂
  3. Emma says:
    Thank you for this great trip! Cows are very present in this blog, but they were in our trip too 🙂
  4. Teresa says:
    Gorgeous — everything and everyone, Catherine — so nice to see Dean and Emma. And the Flying Scotsman — totally great. Luck!! Keep it all coming — I love these posts and photos. Xoxo.
  5. simone says:
    Stunning photos and scenery as always Catherine…had a quiet chuckle at your twosome and the “mad” cows!! haha
  6. Lolo says:
    Wow, what an exceptional blog entry. Tourism, walking, and a bit of politics. Not so sure veal calves have much antibiotics, however!

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