Home » My End to End Land's End to John O'Groats long walk blog » My End to End walk: Leg 11: Days 42 to 45: Monyash to Hebden Bridge; May 8 to 11, 2018, 75.5 miles (121.50) km). Total walked so far: 635.5 miles (1023 km)

My End to End walk: Leg 11: Days 42 to 45: Monyash to Hebden Bridge; May 8 to 11, 2018, 75.5 miles (121.50) km). Total walked so far: 635.5 miles (1023 km)

My End to End walk: Leg 11: Days 42 to 45: Monyash to Hebden Bridge; May 8 to 11, 2018, 75.5 miles (121.50) km). Total walked so far: 635.5 miles (1023 km)

Adventures with Katie: 55 years of friendship! My very first friend, over from Washington State USA to walk w me!

First day: Green and pleasant England.

11th century Peveril Castle.

Sunrise in Castleton. Looking towards Hollins Cross, our first ascent of the day before going down to Edale valley on the other side and beginning of Pennine way.

Looking back toward Upper Booth and the Edale valley.

Our first steps on the PENNINE WAY, the trail of all trails in the UK.

Adorable Gypsy Cobb horses at the top of Jacob’s Ladder.

Kinder Scout

Graham was on his first day, much too laden down with brand new stuff and already exhausted from Jacob’s Ladder. We worried he probably never made it to Crowden. Somehow the first chapters of Sheryl Strayed “Wild” have come to our minds. Other walkers and ourselves in next days referred to him as “Graham Strayed”. I hope he’s ok? 

Katie for scale, waterfall blowing away in the wind over the river Kinder.

Steve and his mates have been hired to drag huge bags full of empty bags from a helicopter drop of stones to build a dam.  They have miles and miles to go… 

They have a long way to go to Edale…

Sandy Heys, crossing with William Clough looking toward Mill Hill.

This was my record 22.5 mile day (37 km). I try to walk less, but no choice here!

Looking back towards Crowden

Crowden Great Brook

Black Hill. The miles and miles of paving stones along the Pennine Way and the amount of work it took in 1991 to lay these to prevent erosion in peat bogs and people sinking to their deaths is awesome. The flagstones came from the floors of derelict mills in the West Pennines. They were destined to be broken up as waste but instead were lifted, packed in crates and flown by helicopter to the Pennine Way. 

Issue Clough

Grouse Butts

Crossing the M62. Strange to see so many cars after and before more silent miles and miles of wind and loneliness…

White Hill

Robin Hood’s Bed

The Aggin stone has been guiding travellers along the Pennine Way for 600 years.

And this roman road is 1500 years old. Trying to imagine……

A long long way to go yet….

“This common stone belongs to the parish of……” last words were erased. This might have been a stone where people left baskets of food for others to come get later during the plague when villages were cut off. The gigantic Stoodley Pike monument in the distance.

Approaching Hebden Bridge

Hebden Bridge

 

Thanks, dear friends, as always for looking and…come walk with me some time!

Still a long long way to go to John O’Groats!

 

14 Responses so far.

  1. Ma chérie, Je mange des yeux ce périple incroyable. 35 km, c’est beaucoup trop….. mais quel paysage parfois si désert, si rude, si grand…. et,que d’aventures et aventureux tu croises. Chic que Katie ait pu t’accompagner pour ce périple. Vive l’amitié ! Je t’admire ma fille chérie et t’accompagne où que tu ailles !
    ta maman qui t’aime.
  2. Ma chérie, Je mange des yeux ce périple incroyable. 35 km, c’est beaucoup trop….. mais quel paysage parfois si désert, si rude, si grand…. et,que d’aventures et aventureux tu croises. Chic que Katie ait pu t’accompagner pour ce périple. Vive l’amitié ! Je t’admire ma fille chérie et t’accompagne où que tu ailles !
    ta maman qui t’aime.
  3. Filipa says:
    What an incredible journey you have embarked on Catherine! Thank you for so generously sharing your experiences & amazing photos that allow us to ‘walk with you’ in spirit. Truely inspiring! Many blessings on the rest of your journey & enjoy every step of the way😘
  4. simone says:
    As always Catherine, your photo’s are amazing and show the true rugged landscape you are embarking on. Love seeing all the people & animals you meet along the way, along with their stories. It is a loonngg way however you will get there in your own time….don’t forget your CASH!! xx
  5. Suchi says:
    So wonderful to follow your journey! Thank you for sharing these pictures and stories and for allowing us to feel like we too are part of it!
  6. Mary O'Leary says:
    What an amazing journey – I’m loving living vicariously through your blog. I so wish my foot (and the rest of my body!) would be in shape to join you for a leg of your trip.
  7. Lop says:
    Catherine!! Gorgeous picts, as always! Its been fun following you on this journey!
  8. Christine Tarazi says:
    Amazing pictures!! What a great journey.
  9. Ingrid says:
    Really great storytelling felt like I was walking those stepping stones with you and could feel the isolation of the villages in plague – thanks for taking me there – awesome
  10. Ingrid says:
    Really great storytelling felt like I was walking those stepping stones with you and could feel the isolation of the villages in plague – thanks for taking me there – awesome
  11. Tiziana says:
    Great pictures! Thank you for sharing … make me jealous, though 🙂
    The place looks really stunning, so green and peaceful
  12. Jan Konesey says:
    I wish the USA had such a wonderful network of walking trails. And I wish I could make it with you. Not sure how long I could walk though
  13. Emma says:
    Love it!
    • simone says:
      As always Catherine, your photo’s are amazing and show the true rugged landscape you are embarking on. Love seeing all the people & animals you meet along the way, along with their stories. It is a loonngg way however you will get there in your own time….don’t forget your CASH!! xx

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